Attending University Abroad: How & Why

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The university or college experience is life changing for many, and with more and more opportunities available for young adults to study abroad, as part of, or in addition to their Gap Year, having an affordable and memorable post secondary education in a country other than your own is easier than ever. Over 313 000 students studied abroad in 2014/15 alone, with 63% of these students studying abroad for up to three weeks, and 3% studying there long term, for a full academic or calendar year. But besides the benefits of simply living in a different country, how is studying abroad more beneficial than simply studying in your home country?

Why Study Abroad?

Cost

The biggest myth surrounding study abroad programs is that they are over expensive and catered to the upper class. This is 100% myth. Many countries, including Germany, France, Norway, and Iceland, offer free tuition to all students (excluding low administrative fees), with many courses and programs specifically to foreign students.

Language Opportunities

One of the biggest benefits of studying in a foreign country is the opportunity to learn a new language. In today’s globalized economy, the ability to communicate effectively is one of many key skills needed to succeed in your job. A recent survey completed by an LA-based business found that nearly 9 out of 10 employers in Europe, Latin America, and Asia believe that being bilingual is crucial for success in the business field. Not only does the ability to communicate in another language give you an advantage, it also allows you to understand more about the country and culture the language is from.

Education

Each country’s educational system is unique, meaning that what may be considered “normal” for some, is completely different to the way things are taught in another place. Having the opportunity to experience the educational system of two different countries forces you to adapt and become more flexible in your learning habits and allows you to better understand the country that you are learning in. Whereas the American educational system places more of an emphasis on individual learning and problem solving for example, the Japanese education system may be more focused on group problem solving and the “collective” rather than the individual.

Preparing to Study Abroad

There are countless study abroad programs available to students, however finding the perfect program or university abroad requires research, time and patience. There is no “one fits all” study abroad program for students, so there are a variety of factors that should be considered when considering which foreign program or university you wish to attend.

There are typically two factors which most influence which study abroad program students attend.

Location

Many students choose to pursue to their studies at a certain university due to the country or location it is in. This could be due to simply already having a connection or personal history to the place or already knowing the language. Other factors which can go into choosing a program based on location is the affordability of the city as well as “employer activity” within the city. QS Top Universities has an in depth list of the best student cities in the world, as well as universities rankings by region

University Ranking

Another method to determine which study abroad to attend is to simply research the top universities for your major or minor. By then knowing which universities are most accredited for chosen field of study, an informed decision can be made in regards to which top ranked university you wish to study at. QS Top Universities also has World University Rankings based on subject, as well as faculty.

By being aware of the best student cities to live in as well as the top universities for your chosen field, an informed decision can be made which will guarantee you the experience of a lifetime.

Scholarships

While tuition fees for study abroad programs may be cheaper than at home, living costs (as well as airfare back and forth) can add up quickly. Here is a list of organizations that have compiled lists of various scholarships and grants that can ease the financial strain of being a student studying in a foreign country.

There are so many factors to consider when deciding to study abroad, and while staying in your comfort zone can be reassuring, the benefits of studying abroad are infinite. Exposure to a new culture, language, and education system widens your horizons and gives you advantages in the work force. It allows you to better understand the globalized society we now live in and makes you more marketable to future employers and grad schools. It allows you to travel and study at the same time, to work towards your goals while at the same time experience a different culture, place and way of life than back home.

While the decision to study abroad is not one that should be taken lightly, anyone who joins the millions of Americans who have ventured across the globe in their studies will find that studying abroad is an experience like no other.

Gap Year Student Stories: An Internship in Washington D.C.

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Once a month we will highlight student experiences from AGA Accredited Programs. This month we’re pleased to bring you the story of Joe Caplis, who is on a program in Washington DC as an intern, through then American University Gap Program.

Getting Started in the AU Gap Program

As a newcomer to the AU Gap Program this spring, I was a little unclear on what to expect. Sure, I had read all the materials provided and looked at what past students had to say about their experience, but nothing I read could have foreshadowed the excitement that was to come.

The first few days were dedicated to preparing for the Internship Fair where about 50 different organizations would be coming to recruit us bright-eyed and bushy-tailed students. I walked into the internship fair a little nervous, but did my best to fall back on the lessons we were taught leading up to the event. The night after the internship fair, I received a call from the Federalist Society, one of my favorite organizations from the fair, asking if I could meet for an interview the next day.

Learning the Skills to Succeed

Our first day of class with Professor Christian Maisch (who is quite the comedian!) featured Ambassador Barbara Stephenson from the American Foreign Service Association in the morning and then we practiced our interview skills with an expert in the afternoon.

After class, I was ready to trek downtown for my internship interview. I walked into the beautiful office building, just a few blocks away from the White House, ready to be put on the grill; but instead was taken to a restaurant where I was relieved to find myself not on the menu! The interview went great!

Working in D.C.

After landing my dream internship with the Federalist Society, I started my career in Washington D.C. as a research associate. Since then, I’ve worked to compile reports on various topics to brief the leadership and have written a short introduction for a well-known Congressman. The work is hard but the hours pass quickly when you’re doing what you love.

After the first week, my co-worker and gap-semester buddy Will and I quickly realized there is only one appropriate way to close out a good week of work. At 5pm, we hop on the Metro toward the Capital and go to D.C.’s best burger joint, Ollie’s Trolley. The only problem so far is the experience is going too quickly—I’m doing my best to savor each fry, one bite at a time.

-Joseph Caplis
AU Gap Student, Spring 2017

Planning your Gap Year Airfare

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Airfare is one of the trickiest elements to building a strong Gap Year. Typically it’s the priciest pieces in the equation of an any Gap Year, and still remains one of the most expensive considerations even on academic study abroads. That being said, there are a lot of ways to save money on your flight. We highly encourage you to start your airfare search early given not only the volatility of the market, but also the constant changes that the airline industries seem to be going through.

There are a lot of elements to consider when scoring a great airfare. Here are a few tips gleaned from years of banging our heads against the proverbial walls of travel:

Know your rights!

The Department of Transportation’s Aviation Consumer Protection Division lays out certainties of compensation and expectations for travelers: http://www.dot.gov/airconsumer. If you feel like you’re not getting this, mention it, and if necessary, never hesitate to talk to a supervisor, or threaten to report the airline. Note: this only is required for US airlines.

Sign up for air miles

These little things are priceless and within a few years you’ll typically earn yourself at least one free domestic flight if not a free international one!

Keep track of your boarding passes

It’s unfortunate, but many airlines will “lose” your information and make it more difficult to get your miles awarded.

Visa Check

If you’re traveling to a place that requires a visa, don’t forget to get one! The airline won’t let you board your plane if you don’t have the necessary visa! Find out if you need one by going to the State Department and checking out the entry requirements for your destination. In many cases you can get a visa-on-arrival, but just as often you’ll need to send your passport to a Consulate General’s Office (a foreign embassy) to get a visa stamp for entry.

Those who ask, receive

If your flight is changed, don’t be afraid to ask for free things – hotel vouchers, meal vouchers, etc. Heck, the worst they can say is ‘no.’

Do your research

Find out online what arrival dates should be cheapest. Keep in mind that weekends will be more expensive, and typically the cheapest day to fly is Wednesday. It’s usually cheapest to book your flight approximately 6 weeks out . . . if not more. Roundtrip tickets will help cut the cost, as will flying early in the morning.

Buy local

Book your regional flights through local carriers. When traveling internationally this is particularly important to do and easily can save you hundreds of dollars simply by booking your flight (for example within Southeast Asia) from a Thai travel agent.

Discount companies aren’t always the best bet

Booking your flight through a discount company – like Priceline, or Expedia, often will save some money but disallow the earning of airmiles, and very regularly will route you through some fairly exhausting itineraries. Remember, the times a traveler are most at risk are in transit, so showing up exhausted and not fully present is a recipe that simply compounds your exposure.

Check here

Don’t forget to check the usual suspects: www.kayak.com, www.Cheapflights.com, and www.yapta.com for good deals.

Read the fine print

Be aware of the terms of your travel: change ticket fees, abilities to re-route, change dates, etc.

Keep composure

Changing your flight once you’ve started can sometimes be simple and sometimes complicated. But remember that when you’re traveling in a foreign country it never helps to lose patience. Be polite, ask for a supervisor if needed, and be patient but assertive.

Student deals

Take advantage of student airfares if you’re currently a student. www.statravel.com.

Do you have any additional tips for keeping airfare low? Help keep us updated!