Gap Years on Instagram!

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Watching Gap Year students take off on exciting adventures is always a blast! This month on Instagram programs are launching and students are making the world their classroom. Check out some of the cool things that are happening and follow their programs on Instagram!

Follow EnRoute Consulting on Instagram

EnRoute

Follow The Leap on Instagram

Leap

Follow Where There Be Dragons on Instagram

Where there be Dragons

Follow Winterline Global Skills on Instagram

Winterline

Follow Rustic Pathways on Instagram

rustic pathways

Follow Outward Bound on Instagram

outward bound

How Gap Year Students Can Help Victims of Natural Disasters

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gap year disaster
The end of the summer has a certain energy to it – last splashes in the pool, back-to-school shopping and ramping up for the newness of a fresh school year (whether you are in school or not). This year, with record-breaking storms lashing much of the southern US, the energy is wholly different. Those without power, shelter or work have been robbed of the reassuring rhythm of daily life. When you strike out for a new grade in school or college or a Gap Year, it is an exciting, anticipated change. When you return from a shelter to a destroyed home, the anguish of such unexpected change is overwhelming.

We are a nation rooted in the idea of helping one’s neighbor in times of need. Even in such a divided climate, this is one area in which we almost always excel. Gap Year students are in a unique position to lend a hand during the cleanup in the hurricane-ravaged south and the wildfire-ravaged west. We cannot wait for national service to become the norm, families need help now. If you are currently on your Gap Year, or plan on taking a semester off next year, here are some great ways to contribute your time to victims of natural disaster:

Volunteer with All Hands:

All Hands Volunteers is a volunteer-powered disaster relief organization dedicated to rebuilding hope for people impacted by natural disasters all over the world. They have already mobilized for Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma relief efforts. Most notably, you can volunteer for any length of time, so it’s very flexible for Gap Year students or professionals who want to take some time off to help.

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Join Americorps as an NCCC or FEMA corps member:

AmeriCorps NCCC (National Civilian Community Corps) is a full-time, team-based residential program for men and women ages 18-24. AmeriCorps NCCC members are assigned to one of five regional campuses into teams of approximately ten members, and complete 2- to 3-month projects responding to local communities’ needs in every state (10-11 months total). They often attend to natural disaster relief efforts. For those wanting to gain experience in disaster relief, the FEMA program focuses specifically on disaster response and recovery.

Sign up for Americorps Updates:

The Corporation for National & Community Service has a new landing page for natural disaster relief efforts. You can see available opportunities there or sign up to receive email updates.

Volunteer in Glacier National Park next summer:

This breathtaking national park is undergoing serious damage as we speak due to wildfire. They will no doubt need lots of help rebuilding trails and structures in summer 2018. Follow their employment page for updates or visit their NGO partner, Glacier National Park Volunteer Associates.

Fundraise for Disaster Relief:

Get creative in supporting those affected by hurricanes or wildfires. Here are lists of reputable organizations to fundraise for:

Hurricane Harvey relief organizations

Montana wildfire relief organizations

Hurricane Irma relief organizations (including Caribbean)

At this moment, families all over the country are in need of our support. If you are currently on your Gap Year, consider donating your time to helping others. Not only will you help those in need, but you will also benefit from lending a hand; volunteers often see improvements in mental health, physical health and overall wellbeing.

Make no mistake, this is the beginning of a new normal where fiercer, more frequent storms are going to disrupt our daily lives.

Current and future Gap Year students: heed the call and make volunteering in disaster relief a part of your gap time.

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Republished with permission from the author, Julia Rogers, of EnRoute Consulting. Originally published on Huffington Post.

Benedict Cumberbatch Credits Success to What He Learned on His Gap Year

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cumberbatch
It’s no secret that taking a Gap Year can change your life and your perspective. But it’s encouraging to hear it from one of the biggest stars on the screen. Benedict Cumberbatch, of Dr. Strange and Sherlock Holmes fame, took a Gap Year? Did you know that? All these years later, with fame and success in his wake, he still points back to that year teaching on a shoestring budget as one of the pivotal points of his life and a secret to his long term success:

“Right after high school, he reportedly saved up money to spend a gap year teaching English to monks in a Tibetan monastery in India. Although, he was given food and lodging, he said he had to learn to live “by very limited means.””

Carol Kuruvilla writes on Huffington Post

She’s quoting and article by Dominic Wells, from The Lion’s Roar where Cumberbatch unpacks the secrets to his on screen success as follows:

“But there’s a deeper reason why, although he takes his craft seriously, he doesn’t take himself too seriously; why he remains famously one of the nicest and most unaffected of major stars. It was the Tibetan monks who taught him that you don’t have to be boring to be serious about your profession or your spirituality: that humor is an intrinsic and necessary part of life.

“They were amazingly warm, intelligent, humorous people,” Cumberbatch recalls with a smile. “Hard to teach English to. I built a blackboard, which no previous teachers seem to have done. With twelve monks in a room, with an age range of about eight to forty, that’s quite important. The reward–punishment thing of sweets or no sweets, or game or no game, worked quite well. But they taught me a lot more than I could possibly ever teach them.”

And what was that, exactly, I ask? “They taught me about the simplicity of human nature, but also the humanity of it, and the ridiculous sense of humor you need to live a full spiritual life.”

“Cumberbatch was an unknown young English teacher when he made his connection to Buddhism at a Tibetan monastery in Darjeeling. He returned to the Himalayas as one of the world’s biggest movie stars.””

The moral of the story: What you learn on your Gap Year sometimes changes the course of your life and becomes the secret of your success!

Gap Years in the News

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As Gap Year programs across the country and around the world get ready to kick off a new academic year of experiential education through travel, the press is highlighting the growing movement and success stories. Here are a few of the best of late:

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Malia Obama’s Gap Year About to End as She Goes to Harvard

The Chicago Tribune writes that the First Daughter took, “Her 12 months of me time, according to news accounts, featured an extended trip last fall to Bolivia and Peru, a journey reportedly organized by a Boulder, Colo., company called Where There Be Dragons.”

“Last February, Malia Obama started an internship with the Weinstein Co., an employee there said. It’s a film and television production and distribution company founded by brothers Bob and Harvey Weinstein. She hit the Sundance Film Festival in January, was spotted in Aspen, Colo., in February, traveled in June with her parents and sister to Bali and rocked out with her younger sister in August at Chicago’s Lollapalooza.”

Gap Year CV

The ‘New’ Gap Year: Is it Worth it, and What Should I do During my Year Before University?

The Telegraph writes about the trend in Gap Years away from a party year towards educational CV enhancement and personal development. We think this is a good thing!

““The perception and purpose of a gap year has substantially changed in the past decade,” says Iwan Williams, the Exam Results Helpline Careers Advisor at Ucas.

“It used to be viewed as a way for young people to ‘dip out’ of the ‘real world’ and take time to go on a voyage of self discovery.

“That’s certainly something people might consider but less and less people are doing it.”

When it comes to gap years, more students are looking for experiences that will not only prove enjoyable, but also fuel their CVs.”
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10 Gap Year Ideas to Get You Packing

Western Union writes about ten Gap Year ideas to get your juices flowing. Considering a Gap Year next year? One of these ideas could catch a spark for your planning:

“Whether you’re transitioning from high school to college, college to the real world, or changing careers, a gap year can be the perfect way to figure out what you want out of life. While more common in Europe, taking a gap year is a growing trend in the U.S., with some prestigious universities even encouraging them. Make the most of your time off with one of these rewarding gap year ideas.”
Gap Year Yara

This Is Why Yara Shahidi Is Taking A Gap Year Before Going To Harvard

Actress Yara Shahidi is deferring her enrollment to Harvard, just like Malia did last year. She tells Essence that plans to spend the time like this:

“I have chosen to defer beginning my academic life at Harvard —plus, I am only 17— to do my best in representing my generation, via Grown-ish, and do a little more ‘growing into’ myself, as well,” she said.

“On the top of my agenda is to continue in the space of activism, particularly helping myself and my peers understand the power and importance of our voices and our votes, because mid-term elections are around the corner for many of us first time voters! I’ll also continue to champion the importance of access to education, as it has been the cornerstone and the foundation of my life, to date.”
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How to Maximize a Gap Year

If you’re going to spend the time and money on a Gap Year you want to get the most out of it, right? The Chicago Tribune references AGA’s National Alumni Survey and Ethan Knight and delivers some great advice:

“Going into the year with a plan is essential, but be sure to leave room for the unknown.

“Leave some space for the free radical,” Knight said. “New things will arise. You may never have known your dream job was out there. You have to leave space for that to be explored.”

A little freedom to explore may be exactly what a student needs during a gap year.”

An Educational Gap Year: What the World Taught Me

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Melanie
I started my 14 _ month long summer vacation with utter excitement. I signed up for things
left and right, knowing exactly what I wanted to learn, what insights I wanted to seek, and more
so what I wanted escape from back at home. Coming from a high society of lost individuals, I set
out to see other worlds and finally feel at home somewhere. So, I packed my things and
journeyed to volunteer in Costa Rica for 3 months. I was able to check off ‘Spanish fluency’ and
‘find home away from home’ from my to-do just as planned. I then lived with my family in
Paraguay for a month, where I worked, studied, and grew close to those closest. It was, just like it
sounds, sheer paradise. Check.

My too-good- to-be- true first semester set a high standard. Second gap semester, I took a
job in bumble-town France where invincible, brave ol’ me abruptly received a culture shock for
which I didn’t sign up. It wasn’t the new food or the incredible difficulty to pronounce the one
word I knew, “quoi?”, it was just this feeling I hadn’t ever had before. With no inspirational
youngsters around, and a plethora of smelly cheese, I stopped feeling like the valiant,
independent explorer who could take on anything. While I expected to discover another unseen
utopia, I’d instead discovered a new side of me, one I didn’t ask to see. However, I had a
challenging, intriguing job, learned French, backpacked through several European cities, and
became best friends with a group of smoking 90 year olds. Check?
melanie hilltop

Through working exotic jobs, adapting to various cultures, and simply living
independently all year, my gap year taught me a lot of things that changed me for the better. At
18, experiencing such an array of jobs has a very worthy reward. I learned to be disciplined,
empathetic, and most of all, patient. I worked along side hardworking, compassionate locals who
taught me the value of caring about what you do. I saw the immense separation between the rich
and the poor in both South America and Europe, and lived with people from both parties. The
jobs I had allowed me to live the very distinctive lives of people from all over the world, and this
experience opened my mind to a much larger extent than I ever thought imaginable.

Looking back, I am so thankful for all the many petit-lessons these jobs instilled in me. For instance, I
farmed organic coffee beansand ever since I fervently appreciate locally grown food. I got a
TEFL certificate and taught English to adults, and never again will I be the disruptive, arrogant
student I once was.

Along the way, I met people who gave up everything they have just to help
me when I had a small issue, and ever since when I can’t find a good friend, I decide to be one.
The list goes on and on. The list, that is, of things I learned not through a book or a college
course, but through raw experience. I learned that there’s a difference between knowing that
something is there (ex: poverty, lack of education, pollution) and living through its detrimental
effects. One adds abstract knowledge and the latter adds empathy and genuine comprehension-
in other words, go live it to really learn about it. I lived, and boy did I learn.
melanie leopards
I also learned a great deal by having the home, people, language, climate, food, and
purpose that I’m used to stripped away from me, only to be faced with complete other worlds to
which to adjust. Adapting to other cultures really opened my eyes to see how the society I grew
up in shaped me into who I am. It opened up my eyes to see that different worlds prioritize
different values- that what many people describe as ‘success’ here in America, is not what success
means at all in many other parts of the world.

Differences like these are the ones that allowed to me reflect on what values I believe, what morals I’d like to take home with me, and why it’s so important to leave your bubbled life as much as possible. Waking up in a different culture every
morning also made me realize that the world is huge and that, as cheesy as it sounds, there really
is no place like home. I learned to appreciate every quality and detail of my life back in
comfortable New York, and realized the blessing it is to always have somewhere so great to call
home.

Lastly, these new cultures taught me the beauty of learning languages. The special thing
about learning languages is that the reward is being able to understand and communicate with
another few hundred million people. When my level of French hit advanced, I faced a whole new
population of people on this planet that I could now personally get to know and uniquely learn
from. It is a great feeling, and I’m only optimistic about learning many more very soon.
Furthermore, I went about my gap year alone, just me, my journal, and I. This was
significant because I frequently left beloved places only to show up to a new place where I, once
again, did not know anyone and had to start all over. This was tough by myself, especially for a
first timer.
melanie zip
When showing up to a new home with a new family, or to a new job with new co-workers, you’ve got to be very self-sufficient. I had no option but to keep my rooms organized, my clothes cleaned, and myself fed. I cooked countless meals, I took hundreds of trains and planes, and I must have packed and unpacked my bag 1000 times. I was vulnerable, forcefully
sparking up small talk in a new language to keep myself from being isolated, and it all made me
so much stronger.

I learned not only to be responsible and disciplined, but also to be brave.
Often I would miss home or feel uneasy in yet another new setting, but I pushed through one un-
comfort zone after another and relentlessly grew into a tenacious, extremely independent 18-
year-old ready to tackle just about anything. Another valuable thing that came out of being alone
for so long was having the time to reflect, and a lot of new things on which to reflect. Finally, the
overload of unfinished thoughts left over from high school were understood. I spent days
analyzing the world around and within me, and now, I feel clear. Thus not only did I have a year
to see and to try new things, but also to think deeply about whom I was prior, and why. I got to
see what about me stayed the same when everything else around me was different, and only then,
did I learn plenty about myself too. Ten months of adventure, challenge, and direct perceptions of
other worlds, inarguably, taught me a lot.

Written by Melanie Russo, who worked with Taylor the Gap to plan and prepare for her independent Gap Year.

Gap Year in the News: Summer 2017

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The media highlights of the Gap Year movement continue. More students are enrolling in Gap Year programs and students in high school are increasingly considering taking a Gap Year as an important piece of their educational plan. Check out these articles and share them with your community:

Making the Most of a Gap Year Before College

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If you’re going to take a Gap Year before college, definitely make the most of it! NBC talks about how to do just that:

“A gap year is a wonderful opportunity for young people to take a year to follow a passion before attending college,” said Avis Hinkson, dean of Barnard College in New York. “Some will have internships, some will travel, some will fulfill religious responsibilities and some find paid work. All-in-all, they will grow and mature.”

“While the reasons for a gap year can vary from the pursuit of a passion project to simply needing to work to earn money toward that degree, in every case, the year should be a worthwhile use of time.

“There are the hard benefits of making money and the other benefits of expanding one’s world view,” Ruderman said. “Schools want to see you do something productive – where you are getting a discernible benefit.”

Why More College Students May Want to Consider a ‘Gap Year’

stoke
VOA Learning English published this piece & accompanying video delving into the reasons behind taking a Gap Year. Check it out:

“Stoke told VOA she felt different when she returned to the United States to begin her studies at Virginia Tech in 2014. She said she felt at ease and that she knew more about herself as a person. Also, when talking with friends who went straight to college from high school, she found many had a difficult time in their first year of college. Some told her they questioned the field of study they had chosen. Others said they felt lost at the college or that they were wasting time doing things like partying.”

Dadline: Don’t Rap the Gap Year

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The Roanoke Times encourages older people to be a little more open mined about the rising trend of taking a Gap Year between high school and college in this call for intergenerational understanding and support:

“Sneer at those kids who take a year off from school, if you want. Call them spoiled, homesick and lazy. Those descriptions would have applied to me in 1987. Heck, they apply to me today. But if a potential college student needs an extra year to make the right decision, one with a lifetime’s worth of consequences, what’s it to you? Doesn’t matter if they spend their time skiing in the Alps or working in a garage, just as long as they figure out how they are going to make a difference in the world.

Believe me, sometimes you can learn a lot more about life away from a classroom than in one.”

How To Make Your Gap Year Valuable To Prospective Employers

This is a big one for a lot of Gap Year participants, whether you’re trying to impress a college board or an employer upon return. A Gap Year can translate into immense benefit to your career path forward, the trick is in communicating that.

“It’s also important to identify the key skills that are crucial to the job you’re applying to. The beauty of gap years is that participants come away with a set of soft skills that are more difficult to hone in a college environment. Knight suggests thinking of your gap year experience from three lenses that an employer will likely value: the ability to work independently and be a self-starter, the ability to collaborate in a team, and the ability to think on your feet and be entrepreneurial when necessary.

Participants of gap years, according to Knight, usually tend to have those skills well documented and well experienced. But it’s important to identify specific instances where they were able to practice those skills, and communicate them to a prospective employer in the interview process.”Screen Shot 2017-07-12 at 11.46.57 AM

More Gap Year News

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The Gap Year movement is definitely on the rise! From personal stories to all the good reasons why a Gap Year is a great choice, there is more media attention on the benefits of taking a Gap Year than ever before. Share these articles with your community:

Considering a Gap Year?

rheanotre-dame.de_.paris__0
With a reputation for encouraging every incoming freshman to take one, it’s not secret that Harvard is a powerhouse supporter of the Gap Year. Rhea Bennett shares what she did on hers and asks some questions to help you think through whether a Gap Year is a good idea for you too:

“Many of us work our butts off during high school to be the best we can be, and that can be tiring. Many students come out of high school with depression or anxiety, or are simply burnt out. That is a-okay! You are allowed to take time off from school to maintain your mental health and well being either before college and/or during college. It is not a race to graduate.”

Yara Shahidi Will Take a Gap Year Before Going to Harvard

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In entertainment and higher education news, another high profile young woman is taking a Gap Year and going public with her plans. Teen Vogue reports:

“Black-ish star Yara Shahidi announced on Instagram last month that she’d accepted an invitation to attend Harvard, where she wanted to major in sociology and African-American studies. But she won’t be headed there this fall, she told InStyle. Like her soon-to-be classmate Malia Obama, she’ll be taking a gap year.”

What You Need to Know if You’re Thinking of Taking a Gap Year

taking-a-gap-year
The South African College of Applied Psychology provides some helpful resources for those in the decision making stage with this article. Check it out:

“What are your motivations for taking a gap year? Give real thought to the rationale behind delaying your further studies. Many of the best benefits of taking a gap year are difficult to quantify: maturity, confidence and a refined sense of direction for instance. As a result, the questions you need to ask yourself should be deep and broad.”

Programs Aim to Make a Gap Year Possible, Regardless of Financial Background

NBC takes the time to highlight Gap Year programs that are working to increase economic parity by providing options for students with financial need. We need more of this!

“Princeton, like Harvard, encourages its incoming first-years to delay the start of college. Programs such as Bridge Year offer incentives to make it as easy as possible, regardless of financial background.

It may seem counter-intuitive, but statistics suggest that a break between high school and college produces students who are more dedicated to their courses and more apt to get involved in service work.”

Gap Year in the News

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There’s been a lot of great media coverage of the Gap Year movement this spring. Here are a few stories to encourage, inspire, and educate yourself, or skeptical friends about the value of a Gap Year.

Two Who Opted for a ‘Gap Year’ After HigScreen Shot 2017-07-12 at 10.52.30 AMh School

Let’s start with two guys who opted for a Gap Year after high school and what they learned, published in The Almanac:

“Asked about being self conscious as an American abroad, Peter sounded a note of humility. “I would never want to assert myself or do anything self-centered (or act to advance) a goal of mine that is self-centered,” he said. “My willingness and interest in using Spanish kind of stems from that respect.””

On walking the whole Appalachian Trail, he said:

“I would say it was very enlightening,” he said of the hike. “When you’re out in the woods every day, you have nothing to think about but yourself.” One insight: “You can kind of wing it if you really put your mind to something. As long as you put your effort into (it) you can achieve some pretty awesome things,” he said. “This is a pretty awesome thing, at least for me. It was something I didn’t think I could do.”

Selling Your Business? Consider Taking a Gap Year

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According to the Miami Herald, Gap Years aren’t just for young people any more! Mid-life or mid-career Gap Years can be the catalyst to the next big thing in your life. Consider this:

“These benefits are not limited to college students. I have witnessed highly successful individuals take gap years after selling their businesses, when they are not yet willing to retire but want to take some time off. They have used the time very wisely to attain even greater professional and/or personal success and fulfillment. Here is the secret:

First, make sure your financial house is in order. Consult your financial advisors and develop a financial plan.”

Voices: How my Gap Year Taught me That I Matter

matt3
USA Today College featured a young man who discovered his worth on a Gap Year:

“Bali was the dose of perspective I needed in my life. Everywhere I looked, I saw people less fortunate than me, but I saw so many smiles as well. These were people who were content because they had people around them, and they were simply happy to be living life. Any love you showed to the children at the school would be reflected back at you two times over. It was a small haven of pure good, and for the first time in my life, I was so happy to be on this planet. Even though I wasn’t happy with myself, I was happy to be where I was.”

18-Year-Old Works Three Jobs to Afford Gap Year Travel to Machu Picchu

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How do you afford to take a Gap Year? YOU WORK! Hard, and a lot, just like Isabel Conde did, as told by Teen Vogue:

“Isabel took a gap year following high school graduation in 2016 and split her time among babysitting, being a law office secretary, and working at World Market. Six months of up to 60 hours per week later, she saved $7,500 for her trip and $1,000 more for college. She put Machu Picchu on her dream board to keep her going.
“I just kinda bought a plane ticket and got on a plane by myself — I didn’t know anyone in Peru,” she told Insider. “I had this moment where I was like ‘What am I doing!’, but as soon as I got [to Peru], I saw the mountains, nature, the beautiful people, and the culture, and I knew I did the best thing I could for myself.””

Gap Year Instagram Inspiration!

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Summer is in full swing and for thousands of young people Gap Year planning is ramping up. With only weeks left before many of the Gap Year programs take off we wanted to share some inspiration from our accredited members. Check it out!

Follow Omprakash on Instagram:

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Follow American University on Instagram:

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Follow Carpe Diem Education on Instagram:

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Follow Amigos de las Americas on Instagram:

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Follow Global Routes on Instagram:

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Follow NOLS on Instagram:

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