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Gap Years in the News

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As Gap Year programs across the country and around the world get ready to kick off a new academic year of experiential education through travel, the press is highlighting the growing movement and success stories. Here are a few of the best of late:

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Malia Obama’s Gap Year About to End as She Goes to Harvard

The Chicago Tribune writes that the First Daughter took, “Her 12 months of me time, according to news accounts, featured an extended trip last fall to Bolivia and Peru, a journey reportedly organized by a Boulder, Colo., company called Where There Be Dragons.”

“Last February, Malia Obama started an internship with the Weinstein Co., an employee there said. It’s a film and television production and distribution company founded by brothers Bob and Harvey Weinstein. She hit the Sundance Film Festival in January, was spotted in Aspen, Colo., in February, traveled in June with her parents and sister to Bali and rocked out with her younger sister in August at Chicago’s Lollapalooza.”

Gap Year CV

The ‘New’ Gap Year: Is it Worth it, and What Should I do During my Year Before University?

The Telegraph writes about the trend in Gap Years away from a party year towards educational CV enhancement and personal development. We think this is a good thing!

““The perception and purpose of a gap year has substantially changed in the past decade,” says Iwan Williams, the Exam Results Helpline Careers Advisor at Ucas.

“It used to be viewed as a way for young people to ‘dip out’ of the ‘real world’ and take time to go on a voyage of self discovery.

“That’s certainly something people might consider but less and less people are doing it.”

When it comes to gap years, more students are looking for experiences that will not only prove enjoyable, but also fuel their CVs.”
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10 Gap Year Ideas to Get You Packing

Western Union writes about ten Gap Year ideas to get your juices flowing. Considering a Gap Year next year? One of these ideas could catch a spark for your planning:

“Whether you’re transitioning from high school to college, college to the real world, or changing careers, a gap year can be the perfect way to figure out what you want out of life. While more common in Europe, taking a gap year is a growing trend in the U.S., with some prestigious universities even encouraging them. Make the most of your time off with one of these rewarding gap year ideas.”
Gap Year Yara

This Is Why Yara Shahidi Is Taking A Gap Year Before Going To Harvard

Actress Yara Shahidi is deferring her enrollment to Harvard, just like Malia did last year. She tells Essence that plans to spend the time like this:

“I have chosen to defer beginning my academic life at Harvard —plus, I am only 17— to do my best in representing my generation, via Grown-ish, and do a little more ‘growing into’ myself, as well,” she said.

“On the top of my agenda is to continue in the space of activism, particularly helping myself and my peers understand the power and importance of our voices and our votes, because mid-term elections are around the corner for many of us first time voters! I’ll also continue to champion the importance of access to education, as it has been the cornerstone and the foundation of my life, to date.”
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How to Maximize a Gap Year

If you’re going to spend the time and money on a Gap Year you want to get the most out of it, right? The Chicago Tribune references AGA’s National Alumni Survey and Ethan Knight and delivers some great advice:

“Going into the year with a plan is essential, but be sure to leave room for the unknown.

“Leave some space for the free radical,” Knight said. “New things will arise. You may never have known your dream job was out there. You have to leave space for that to be explored.”

A little freedom to explore may be exactly what a student needs during a gap year.”

An Educational Gap Year: What the World Taught Me

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Melanie
I started my 14 _ month long summer vacation with utter excitement. I signed up for things
left and right, knowing exactly what I wanted to learn, what insights I wanted to seek, and more
so what I wanted escape from back at home. Coming from a high society of lost individuals, I set
out to see other worlds and finally feel at home somewhere. So, I packed my things and
journeyed to volunteer in Costa Rica for 3 months. I was able to check off ‘Spanish fluency’ and
‘find home away from home’ from my to-do just as planned. I then lived with my family in
Paraguay for a month, where I worked, studied, and grew close to those closest. It was, just like it
sounds, sheer paradise. Check.

My too-good- to-be- true first semester set a high standard. Second gap semester, I took a
job in bumble-town France where invincible, brave ol’ me abruptly received a culture shock for
which I didn’t sign up. It wasn’t the new food or the incredible difficulty to pronounce the one
word I knew, “quoi?”, it was just this feeling I hadn’t ever had before. With no inspirational
youngsters around, and a plethora of smelly cheese, I stopped feeling like the valiant,
independent explorer who could take on anything. While I expected to discover another unseen
utopia, I’d instead discovered a new side of me, one I didn’t ask to see. However, I had a
challenging, intriguing job, learned French, backpacked through several European cities, and
became best friends with a group of smoking 90 year olds. Check?
melanie hilltop

Through working exotic jobs, adapting to various cultures, and simply living
independently all year, my gap year taught me a lot of things that changed me for the better. At
18, experiencing such an array of jobs has a very worthy reward. I learned to be disciplined,
empathetic, and most of all, patient. I worked along side hardworking, compassionate locals who
taught me the value of caring about what you do. I saw the immense separation between the rich
and the poor in both South America and Europe, and lived with people from both parties. The
jobs I had allowed me to live the very distinctive lives of people from all over the world, and this
experience opened my mind to a much larger extent than I ever thought imaginable.

Looking back, I am so thankful for all the many petit-lessons these jobs instilled in me. For instance, I
farmed organic coffee beansand ever since I fervently appreciate locally grown food. I got a
TEFL certificate and taught English to adults, and never again will I be the disruptive, arrogant
student I once was.

Along the way, I met people who gave up everything they have just to help
me when I had a small issue, and ever since when I can’t find a good friend, I decide to be one.
The list goes on and on. The list, that is, of things I learned not through a book or a college
course, but through raw experience. I learned that there’s a difference between knowing that
something is there (ex: poverty, lack of education, pollution) and living through its detrimental
effects. One adds abstract knowledge and the latter adds empathy and genuine comprehension-
in other words, go live it to really learn about it. I lived, and boy did I learn.
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I also learned a great deal by having the home, people, language, climate, food, and
purpose that I’m used to stripped away from me, only to be faced with complete other worlds to
which to adjust. Adapting to other cultures really opened my eyes to see how the society I grew
up in shaped me into who I am. It opened up my eyes to see that different worlds prioritize
different values- that what many people describe as ‘success’ here in America, is not what success
means at all in many other parts of the world.

Differences like these are the ones that allowed to me reflect on what values I believe, what morals I’d like to take home with me, and why it’s so important to leave your bubbled life as much as possible. Waking up in a different culture every
morning also made me realize that the world is huge and that, as cheesy as it sounds, there really
is no place like home. I learned to appreciate every quality and detail of my life back in
comfortable New York, and realized the blessing it is to always have somewhere so great to call
home.

Lastly, these new cultures taught me the beauty of learning languages. The special thing
about learning languages is that the reward is being able to understand and communicate with
another few hundred million people. When my level of French hit advanced, I faced a whole new
population of people on this planet that I could now personally get to know and uniquely learn
from. It is a great feeling, and I’m only optimistic about learning many more very soon.
Furthermore, I went about my gap year alone, just me, my journal, and I. This was
significant because I frequently left beloved places only to show up to a new place where I, once
again, did not know anyone and had to start all over. This was tough by myself, especially for a
first timer.
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When showing up to a new home with a new family, or to a new job with new co-workers, you’ve got to be very self-sufficient. I had no option but to keep my rooms organized, my clothes cleaned, and myself fed. I cooked countless meals, I took hundreds of trains and planes, and I must have packed and unpacked my bag 1000 times. I was vulnerable, forcefully
sparking up small talk in a new language to keep myself from being isolated, and it all made me
so much stronger.

I learned not only to be responsible and disciplined, but also to be brave.
Often I would miss home or feel uneasy in yet another new setting, but I pushed through one un-
comfort zone after another and relentlessly grew into a tenacious, extremely independent 18-
year-old ready to tackle just about anything. Another valuable thing that came out of being alone
for so long was having the time to reflect, and a lot of new things on which to reflect. Finally, the
overload of unfinished thoughts left over from high school were understood. I spent days
analyzing the world around and within me, and now, I feel clear. Thus not only did I have a year
to see and to try new things, but also to think deeply about whom I was prior, and why. I got to
see what about me stayed the same when everything else around me was different, and only then,
did I learn plenty about myself too. Ten months of adventure, challenge, and direct perceptions of
other worlds, inarguably, taught me a lot.

Written by Melanie Russo, who worked with Taylor the Gap to plan and prepare for her independent Gap Year.

Gap Year in the News: Summer 2017

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The media highlights of the Gap Year movement continue. More students are enrolling in Gap Year programs and students in high school are increasingly considering taking a Gap Year as an important piece of their educational plan. Check out these articles and share them with your community:

Making the Most of a Gap Year Before College

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If you’re going to take a Gap Year before college, definitely make the most of it! NBC talks about how to do just that:

“A gap year is a wonderful opportunity for young people to take a year to follow a passion before attending college,” said Avis Hinkson, dean of Barnard College in New York. “Some will have internships, some will travel, some will fulfill religious responsibilities and some find paid work. All-in-all, they will grow and mature.”

“While the reasons for a gap year can vary from the pursuit of a passion project to simply needing to work to earn money toward that degree, in every case, the year should be a worthwhile use of time.

“There are the hard benefits of making money and the other benefits of expanding one’s world view,” Ruderman said. “Schools want to see you do something productive – where you are getting a discernible benefit.”

Why More College Students May Want to Consider a ‘Gap Year’

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VOA Learning English published this piece & accompanying video delving into the reasons behind taking a Gap Year. Check it out:

“Stoke told VOA she felt different when she returned to the United States to begin her studies at Virginia Tech in 2014. She said she felt at ease and that she knew more about herself as a person. Also, when talking with friends who went straight to college from high school, she found many had a difficult time in their first year of college. Some told her they questioned the field of study they had chosen. Others said they felt lost at the college or that they were wasting time doing things like partying.”

Dadline: Don’t Rap the Gap Year

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The Roanoke Times encourages older people to be a little more open mined about the rising trend of taking a Gap Year between high school and college in this call for intergenerational understanding and support:

“Sneer at those kids who take a year off from school, if you want. Call them spoiled, homesick and lazy. Those descriptions would have applied to me in 1987. Heck, they apply to me today. But if a potential college student needs an extra year to make the right decision, one with a lifetime’s worth of consequences, what’s it to you? Doesn’t matter if they spend their time skiing in the Alps or working in a garage, just as long as they figure out how they are going to make a difference in the world.

Believe me, sometimes you can learn a lot more about life away from a classroom than in one.”

How To Make Your Gap Year Valuable To Prospective Employers

This is a big one for a lot of Gap Year participants, whether you’re trying to impress a college board or an employer upon return. A Gap Year can translate into immense benefit to your career path forward, the trick is in communicating that.

“It’s also important to identify the key skills that are crucial to the job you’re applying to. The beauty of gap years is that participants come away with a set of soft skills that are more difficult to hone in a college environment. Knight suggests thinking of your gap year experience from three lenses that an employer will likely value: the ability to work independently and be a self-starter, the ability to collaborate in a team, and the ability to think on your feet and be entrepreneurial when necessary.

Participants of gap years, according to Knight, usually tend to have those skills well documented and well experienced. But it’s important to identify specific instances where they were able to practice those skills, and communicate them to a prospective employer in the interview process.”Screen Shot 2017-07-12 at 11.46.57 AM

International Experience and University

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How many extra credits can I pack in? Will this essay work for my college admissions? Which school is going to be the best for me? Will I make friends?

What if we’ve been asking ourselves the wrong questions all along? What would happen if we stopped focusing on how to “make college work” and instead focused on personal goals for the college experience and the years beyond?

Setting those personal goals begins with a deep understanding of what we want. Unfortunately, most of us truly don’t know what we want from the future right out of high school. I didn’t. It takes some time for most students to get to know their interests, passions, and goals for the future. International travel can help to clarify what we’re shooting for over the next 5-10 years. What’s more, it can help us to succeed in the world of college applications and new social scenes. Here are a few ways international travel can boost your college experience and help you to set your own goals:

Successful College Admissions

University admissions have become increasingly competitive as pursuing higher education becomes the norm. College admissions officers are looking for students who stand out from the crowd. Nowadays, students trying to land entry to their dream college will need something more unique than a top-notch GPA under their belts. Luckily for you, a combination of travel and personal study can build a killer college application.

What about the time you spent hiking in the Alps, studying local flora and fauna along the way? Or the time you went scuba diving off the coast of Australia? Put it on the application to show your interest in environmental studies! With a bit of intentional thought and study along the way, travel experiences can turn into application gold. I used travel to prove that I was passionate about my major and was already diving in on my own.

International Experience & Competitive Uni Clubs

This is a benefit of international experience I´d never heard of until it happened to me. A year into my university experience, I discovered a campus club I was interested in joining. An offshoot of WUSC, the club provided mentors and support to incoming refugee students sponsored by my university. But there was a catch. Entry to the club is incredibly competitive. I needed to prove that I was passionate about helping people, sensitive to the experiences of moving to a new country, and open to cultural differences.

With tons of international experience under my belt, I aced the interview and was immediately accepted to be a mentor! It turned out to be one of my best university experiences yet. As you work through college, you’ll find that a travel background can open doors to competitive experiences.

Score an Internship

When fellow students and professors see that you’ve had real-world experiences outside of a campus setting, they’re more willing to hand over responsibilities and opportunities. Makes sense, right? Students who travel have already proven themselves to be capable, responsible, and dedicated to their goals. These are the kinds of people who are top picks for internships, mentorships, and leadership positions. Knowing that I had traveled before, my professor picked me for a two month internship at a research library in Guatemala.

Immersion in Your Subject Area

A Gap Year is a chance to explore your field of interest before committing to a major. Want to go into marine biology? Take a year to dive and study the ocean on your own. Interested in geography? Spend time studying landforms and unique cultures around the world. Interested in language arts? Take language courses and visit local theaters as you travel.

Not only will you be getting an in-depth look into your future degree program of choice, you’ll also be racking up the experience needed for a killer application. Worst case scenario: you discover you’re not as into your major as you thought. Better now than three years in!

Professional Networking

Be sure to network with people outside of your peer group as you wander, you never know when you’ll bump into someone in your field who can give you some insight or a boost in your dream career. Success is all about connections. Use your time wisely and intentionally connect with people who can help you towards your goals. Who knows? Your Gap Year could change your life through these people!

Personal Confidence, Clarity, & Vision

This is the big one for me. Going straight from high school to university gives you zero time to get to know yourself, to pursue your interests, and to get your feet under you as an adult. Before university, I backpacked Europe with my boyfriend. I drove across the U.S. And during that time, I learned a great deal about where I wanted to take the next 5-10 years of my life.

By the time I entered university, I felt confident. I knew my major was right for me, and I was ready to take on my university years with a vision for my future. As a result, I’ve been more committed to my schoolwork, more interested in what I’m learning, and have been able to say yes to the opportunities that fit with my goals.

If you’re not sure what college suits you yet.
Travel.

If you’re not in love with the idea of picking a major. Travel.

If you want to give yourself a boost in the resume and experience department. Travel.

Feeling shy and unsure of yourself? Travel.

Think you’ve got it all together on your own? Travel.

There’s nothing to lose, and a world to explore.

More Gap Year News

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The Gap Year movement is definitely on the rise! From personal stories to all the good reasons why a Gap Year is a great choice, there is more media attention on the benefits of taking a Gap Year than ever before. Share these articles with your community:

Considering a Gap Year?

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With a reputation for encouraging every incoming freshman to take one, it’s not secret that Harvard is a powerhouse supporter of the Gap Year. Rhea Bennett shares what she did on hers and asks some questions to help you think through whether a Gap Year is a good idea for you too:

“Many of us work our butts off during high school to be the best we can be, and that can be tiring. Many students come out of high school with depression or anxiety, or are simply burnt out. That is a-okay! You are allowed to take time off from school to maintain your mental health and well being either before college and/or during college. It is not a race to graduate.”

Yara Shahidi Will Take a Gap Year Before Going to Harvard

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In entertainment and higher education news, another high profile young woman is taking a Gap Year and going public with her plans. Teen Vogue reports:

“Black-ish star Yara Shahidi announced on Instagram last month that she’d accepted an invitation to attend Harvard, where she wanted to major in sociology and African-American studies. But she won’t be headed there this fall, she told InStyle. Like her soon-to-be classmate Malia Obama, she’ll be taking a gap year.”

What You Need to Know if You’re Thinking of Taking a Gap Year

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The South African College of Applied Psychology provides some helpful resources for those in the decision making stage with this article. Check it out:

“What are your motivations for taking a gap year? Give real thought to the rationale behind delaying your further studies. Many of the best benefits of taking a gap year are difficult to quantify: maturity, confidence and a refined sense of direction for instance. As a result, the questions you need to ask yourself should be deep and broad.”

Programs Aim to Make a Gap Year Possible, Regardless of Financial Background

NBC takes the time to highlight Gap Year programs that are working to increase economic parity by providing options for students with financial need. We need more of this!

“Princeton, like Harvard, encourages its incoming first-years to delay the start of college. Programs such as Bridge Year offer incentives to make it as easy as possible, regardless of financial background.

It may seem counter-intuitive, but statistics suggest that a break between high school and college produces students who are more dedicated to their courses and more apt to get involved in service work.”

Gap Year in the News

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There’s been a lot of great media coverage of the Gap Year movement this spring. Here are a few stories to encourage, inspire, and educate yourself, or skeptical friends about the value of a Gap Year.

Two Who Opted for a ‘Gap Year’ After HigScreen Shot 2017-07-12 at 10.52.30 AMh School

Let’s start with two guys who opted for a Gap Year after high school and what they learned, published in The Almanac:

“Asked about being self conscious as an American abroad, Peter sounded a note of humility. “I would never want to assert myself or do anything self-centered (or act to advance) a goal of mine that is self-centered,” he said. “My willingness and interest in using Spanish kind of stems from that respect.””

On walking the whole Appalachian Trail, he said:

“I would say it was very enlightening,” he said of the hike. “When you’re out in the woods every day, you have nothing to think about but yourself.” One insight: “You can kind of wing it if you really put your mind to something. As long as you put your effort into (it) you can achieve some pretty awesome things,” he said. “This is a pretty awesome thing, at least for me. It was something I didn’t think I could do.”

Selling Your Business? Consider Taking a Gap Year

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According to the Miami Herald, Gap Years aren’t just for young people any more! Mid-life or mid-career Gap Years can be the catalyst to the next big thing in your life. Consider this:

“These benefits are not limited to college students. I have witnessed highly successful individuals take gap years after selling their businesses, when they are not yet willing to retire but want to take some time off. They have used the time very wisely to attain even greater professional and/or personal success and fulfillment. Here is the secret:

First, make sure your financial house is in order. Consult your financial advisors and develop a financial plan.”

Voices: How my Gap Year Taught me That I Matter

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USA Today College featured a young man who discovered his worth on a Gap Year:

“Bali was the dose of perspective I needed in my life. Everywhere I looked, I saw people less fortunate than me, but I saw so many smiles as well. These were people who were content because they had people around them, and they were simply happy to be living life. Any love you showed to the children at the school would be reflected back at you two times over. It was a small haven of pure good, and for the first time in my life, I was so happy to be on this planet. Even though I wasn’t happy with myself, I was happy to be where I was.”

18-Year-Old Works Three Jobs to Afford Gap Year Travel to Machu Picchu

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How do you afford to take a Gap Year? YOU WORK! Hard, and a lot, just like Isabel Conde did, as told by Teen Vogue:

“Isabel took a gap year following high school graduation in 2016 and split her time among babysitting, being a law office secretary, and working at World Market. Six months of up to 60 hours per week later, she saved $7,500 for her trip and $1,000 more for college. She put Machu Picchu on her dream board to keep her going.
“I just kinda bought a plane ticket and got on a plane by myself — I didn’t know anyone in Peru,” she told Insider. “I had this moment where I was like ‘What am I doing!’, but as soon as I got [to Peru], I saw the mountains, nature, the beautiful people, and the culture, and I knew I did the best thing I could for myself.””

Gap Year Instagram Inspiration!

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Summer is in full swing and for thousands of young people Gap Year planning is ramping up. With only weeks left before many of the Gap Year programs take off we wanted to share some inspiration from our accredited members. Check it out!

Follow Omprakash on Instagram:

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Follow American University on Instagram:

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Follow Carpe Diem Education on Instagram:

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Follow Amigos de las Americas on Instagram:

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Follow Global Routes on Instagram:

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Follow NOLS on Instagram:

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College Applications and Gap Years

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Sterling College Senior Dinner

Sterling College Senior Dinner


What do college admissions officers think about Gap Years, and how might the decision to take a Gap Year impact your college application prospects? In this post Tim Patterson, Director of Admission at Sterling College in Vermont, sheds some light on Gap Years from the perspective of a college admissions officer.

More and more students are choosing to take a gap year between high school and college. For college admissions officers like me, the growing popularity of gap years is a trend that merits close attention. Personally, I am a big fan of gap years because I believe that students who take a gap year arrive at college having gained a clearer sense of purpose that helps them focus and succeed in their program of choice. However, Gap Year students need to figure out how to approach the college application process, including the question of when to apply.

Should I Apply To College Before Taking A Gap Year?

Students often ask if they should finish their college applications and defer enrollment before taking a Gap Year. Most colleges, including Sterling College, allow students who receive an offer of admission to defer for up to one year by submitting an enrollment deposit. Alternatively, some students choose to hold off and complete the application process during their gap year, or apply after the gap year is complete. There are pros and cons to each approach.

The conventional wisdom that I usually hear from college counselors and parents of gap year students is that students should finish the college application process before embarking on a gap year. The argument goes something like this:

Settling on a college before a gap year helps students because they can access all of the resources of their high school college counseling office while completing their college applications. Additionally, by deferring college enrollment before a Gap Year students can make the most of their Gap Year experience instead of being distracted by college applications.

If you stop and consider the perspective of many college counselors and parents this argument makes a lot of sense. After all, counselors and parents have been known to worry that a Gap Year might somehow lead a student off track, and they want the reassurance of knowing where and when the student will go to college. Also, since high schools keep track of the plans of graduating seniors and often look favorably on graduating a high percentage of college bound students, guidance counselors can sometimes feel pressure to successfully “close the file” on each student before graduation. However, I think a different approach is often the right call.

You can apply to college during a Gap Year

You absolutely CAN apply to colleges during a Gap Year, and for many students I think that doing so is the right choice. Here’s why:

A Gap Year is a time of growth and change

Students almost always gain a great deal of perspective and maturity during a Gap Year, and many emerge from the experience with new academic interests and a more evolved sense of purpose. Applying this new perspective and self-knowledge to the college search can lead to students to consider college options that are a better fit given the self-knowledge gained during the gap year. Precluding that possibility by choosing a college before the gap year might be the “safest” option, but I think it’s a missed opportunity.

Not going to college right away isn’t a catastrophe

The average age of a student here at Sterling College in Vermont is 22, and generally speaking students who have life and work experience before college are more focused and successful in their studies. There is nothing wrong with delaying college until you’re fully ready, clear-headed, and prepared. If your Gap Year leads you to other opportunities, it’s OK to take advantage of them instead of imposing a fixed end to your gap year experience.

A Gap Year can make your college applications stronger

When my colleagues and I are evaluating applications, we look for things that set an applicant apart. Students who are able to describe their Gap Year are often our most captivating applicants, and we know from experience that students who have completed a Gap Year are often better prepared for success in college than their peers who attend college straight out of high school.

Students with a clear sense of purpose thrive in college

I keep coming back to the phrase “sense of purpose” because I think it’s a pivotal part of the whole conversation about Gap Years and college applications.

Like many colleges, Sterling College has a clear mission and purpose – we happen to be focused on a mission of environmental stewardship, with majors in Sustainable Agriculture, Sustainable Food Systems, Ecology, Outdoor Education, and Environmental Humanities. It takes a very focused student to succeed at Sterling, and we look hard for evidence of that sense of purpose during the application process. A gap year is a great opportunity to hone in on a sense of purpose, and then approach college applications with clearer focus and intent.

Gap Year students can be savvy about financial aid

Finally, a word about affordability. I believe that we are in the midst of a student debt crisis in this country, and I am often shocked at how little students and parents know about financial aid and college affordability in general. I could write a whole series of posts about financial aid, but here are the points that are most relevant to gap year students:

  • Financial aid packages can change from year to year.
  • Students are in the best position to advocate for an affordable financial aid package BEFORE they commit to a college.

By committing to a college before receiving the financial aid package for the academic year in which they plan to attend, students sacrifice all of their leverage and are unable to compare financial aid packages and find the best fit at the best price.

The choice is yours

Ultimately, the choice of whether to apply to college before, during, or after a gap year is up to you. If you have already have a clear sense of where and why you want to go to college, by all means go ahead and lock in your plans before your gap year. Just don’t feel as if there is only one path that you need to follow. One of the most important lessons of a gap year is that you are free to make your own choices, and use your own compass to navigate the world. This is true in life, and in college as well.

To contact Tim Patterson, or learn more about Sterling College, please visit www.sterlingcollege.edu.

First Annual AGA Gap Year Awards are Presented to…

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One of the exciting additions to the International Gap Year Conference, in Denver, this year was the inaugural presentation of awards. Delighted by the numerous nominations, the conference committee was pleased to present the following awards for Innovation, Research, Accessibility, and Advancing the Movement.

Excellence & Equity in Accessibility

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This award is presented to an individual or corporate body that has pushed the boundaries in expanding equity and accessibility in the Gap Year movement, creating greater opportunities for students overcoming obstacles.

Global Citizen Year

Global Citizen Year is actively working to democratize travel and dispel the myth that a Gap Year is “just for rich kids.” Recognizing that talent is universal but opportunity is not GCY has built a program that honors that ethos.

To date, 80% of Global Citizen Year Fellows have received some level of need-based financial aid, and 30% have received a fully-funded scholarship. This year alone, Global Citizen Year will provide over $2M in scholarships to low-income participants. Perhaps the most telling statistics regarding the diversity of our their Fellow cohort are that 47% are eligible to receive Pell Grants for college and 45% self-identify as people of color.

Global Citizen Year’s commitment to access means the next generation of new leaders will increasingly reflect the diversity of our country.

Karl Haigler Excellence in Gap Year Research Award

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Honoring the long standing work and commitment to research in the Gap Year community, pioneered by Karl Haigler, the first presentation of this award was made by Karl.

Corinne Guidi

Corrinne Guidi is on the AGA Research Committee and has been working through Nina Hoe’s National Alumni Survey to draw out more meaningful data. Focusing on a qualitative study on Alumni Student Outcomes, Corinne has been mining through nearly 500 open-ended survey questions, brining to life the words of alumni from the deep well of data.

Corinne’s deep work is acknowledged through this reward for taking the NAS data to another level.

Advancing the Gap Year Movement

robin
This award is presented to an individual or corporate body who has demonstrated a commitment to advancing the Gap Year movement, from within as well as externally.

Robin Pendoley, Thinking Beyond Borders

Robin has served as co-founder, curriculum director, and now CEO of Thinking Beyond Borders for almost 10 years. During this time he has established TBB as one of the most well-respected Gap Year organizations in the field, all the while lending an important voice to the field as a whole.

As a co-director of the USA Gap Year Fairs for 5 years, Robin helped oversee the expansion of the fairs to the thriving fair circuit and turnout we see today. As a founding board member for AGA, Robin sought to bring his expertise in programming and pedagogy to the standards process, as well as his influence to bring around other members of the industry to the importance of a national accrediting body. Under Robin’s leadership, TBB became the first AGA-accredited organization when the process began in 2013.

Robin has played a pivotal role in the Gap Year movement in helping to revolutionize what overseas travel for Gap Year students can be–beyond just service hours and voluntourism–but genuine authentic engagement that seeks to develop the essential skills and capacities students need to lead exceptional social impact careers. An educator first and foremost, Robin has pioneered an educational institution that goes beyond the theoretical confines of traditional education, one that facilitates rigorous learning environments that engage with the world, examine its challenges, and place students alongside leaders who are committed to finding solutions to critical global issues.

Robin continues to provide a thoughtful and reflective voice in the national media, advocating for the value of gap years through his blog series on the transition to college at Psychology Today, the social impact sector at Forbes, and profiling TBB’s work in the Harvard Ed School magazine. All of this exposure has one common theme: helping to highlight the legitimate educational value that well-structured and intentional programs can provide to students.

Innovation in Programming

Julia
This award is given in recognition of significant innovation in some aspect of programming, recognizing an individual or corporate contribution to thinking outside the box and moving the community forward.

Julia Rogers, En Route Consulting

Julia’s relentless commitment to improving outcomes for students and advancing the Gap Year cause is well known within the community. As an IEC who works closely with both students and programs, she has worked hard to overcome obstacles for students and create unique solutions and opportunities for individual success within their Gap Year plans.

This year, Julia pioneered Gap Year Decision Day, May 25, and has rallied community support to further amplify the voices of students and Gap Year advocates on a larger scale.

Congratulations!

A hearty congratulations to all of the recipients of the 2017 AGA Gap Year Awards. Thank you, deeply, for your service and your commitment to the community. Your example sets a high bar for excellence in all aspects of the industry.

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